Very Brief Doctor Who Reviews – Season Seventeen

Destiny of the Daleks – Good Lord, is this story boring. In hindsight, maybe doing a story where 90% of your characters have no emotion wasn’t such a great idea after all. I think the scene of the Daleks exterminating extras might be one of the worst I’ve ever seen – they just stand in a line, wait to be zapped, and then fall into the pile of pillows next to them, all the while a single emotion never crosses their faces. Is this a Two Doctors scenario where they would have to pay the extras more if they actually acted? And have the Daleks ever looked worse than the scene in which a Dalek flails around with its vision impaired while Davros shouts “he’s behind you.” I know one of the charms of Doctor Who is that he sometimes defeats enemies simply by being more fun, but this isn’t fun, this is torture. And since when were Daleks completely logical – they’re driven by hatred and anger; no one is logical when they’re angry. Was even Terry Nation confusing them with the Cybermen? Also, the decision to replace incidental music with the sound of drilling for vast swathes of the story, really doesn’t work in its favour. I’m not the greatest Dudley Simpson fan, but the episode just so bare and feels unfinished without it. Ken Grieve’s direction also seems to be lacking something; it’s odd because there are some shots like the low angle of Davros that look quite impressive and unlike anything else at the time, but the whole episode is so overlit, that, again, it feels unfinished. I will say one nice thing about this episode, and that is that Romana crossplaying as the Doctor is adorable. But even the charms of Lalla Ward can’t save this story. 1/10

City of Death – Talk about going from the sublime to the ridiculous (or the other way around). This story is perfect. It is the best Doctor Who story. . I defy you to find one thing wrong with it. Oh, alright, apart from Julian Glover’s nose being visible through the mask. But other than that, this story is flawless. The music is excellent, Dudley Simpson’s finest score for the series, in my oopinion. the direction is superb – the scenes in the café at night look like they could have come out of a film). The acting is pure class – Julian Glover and Katherine Schell ooze so much charm you almost forget that they’re evil, and the Doctor and Romana’s relationship shows the Doctor/companion dynamic at its warmest and wittiest; you don’t even notice that a certain robot dog is missing. Of course, the absolute highlight is the script, so bare with me while I just quote some of my favourite lines: “If you wanted an omelette, I’d expect to find a pile of broken crockery, a cooker in flames and an unconscious chef.”; “If there’s one thing I can’t stand, it’s being tortured by someone with cold hands.”; “My dear, I don’t think he’s as stupid as he seems.”/”My dear, nobody could be as stupid as he seems.” Perhaps, when you get right down to it, the resolution (Duggan punches Scaroth) isn’t the cleverest the show’s ever come up with, but it’s been set up so well in the previous four episodes, that I don’t mind. One of only a handful of stories where I feel genuine sadness when it’s over. Exquisite. 10/10

The Creature from the Pit – “We call it… the pit.” My goodness, there are some fabulous moments of hamtastic fun to be had. Romana running rings around the bandits; K9’s continual insistence that he’s not made of tin; Organon finishing the episode by starting his psychic con up all over agin. The jungle set is one of the better ones – it helps that it’s been shot on film (although the backcloths don’t quite manage to convince). There’s a single shot of Erato, where he appears to take up the whole cavern, and he actually looks quite good. It’s just every single other time he appears that he looks like an unconvincing and indecent blob. It’s a pity, despite the moments of fun, that the rest of the story is generally not very good. I find Adrasta and her cohorts more irritating than anything else (if I wanted to see an evil stepmother, I’d have watched Cinderella instead) and the Doctor spends the middle episodes wandering around the pit looking for the plot. And then despite having been in the plot for the past however many centuries, today just happens to be the day that they Tythonions happen to attack. This story was the first recorded for Lalla Ward and David Brierly as Romana and K9, respectively, and it really shows, with both actors trying their hardest to do a poor man’s imitation of their predecessors. But while Lalla Ward eventually found her own Romana, I don’t think David Brierly ever could capture the charm of John Leeson. As I said, if you’re in the right mood, this story can be a lot of fun. You just have to really be in the right mood. 4/10

Nightmare of Eden – This story is criminally underrated: it’s brilliant. For ages it had a reputation as being silly, but it really isn’t. This is Doctor Who’s attempt to tackle drugs – can you think of anything more serious that the show has dealt with. OK yes, it’s done mass murder, but how many of us are going to face the prospect of committing genocide, and then there’s the kidnapping arc in series six but the fallout of that was never really dealt with, so I stand by my first statement. I appreciate that Bob Baker didn’t just make Tryst evil; selfish, perhaps, but he ultimately believed what he was doing was for the greater good. On the other hand, the Doctor’s quiet anger, refusing to even look at him and he tells him to go away, is a really powerful moment. The cliffhanger to part two is one of my favourite ever. The first time I saw it, as the Doctor and Romana change all the rules and jump into what had until now seemed like a fancy viewfinder, my reaction was ‘Wow, I can’t wait until to tomorrow night to see the next episode.’ If you can’t tell, I really like this one.

7/10

The Horns of Nimon – Name one character in this story other than the three regulars who you care the least bit about. I’ve wracked my brain and I can only think of Sezom, that old guy who appears in three scenes in the final episode. And even he apparently used to be a power mad tyrant. You see what you did story – you made me sympathise with Hitler. OK, I’m being silly. But seriously. The tributes are so wet I’m getting trench foot just looking at them; Graham Crowden as Soldeed is still picking bits of scenery out of his teeth; and the Co-Pilot… keeps yelling ‘weakling scum,’ for some reason. If it weren’t for Romana, I don’t think there would be a single thing to enjoy about this. Seriously, she’s awesome: she’s built her own sonic screwdriver (and we know it’s better than the Doctor’s because he tries to steal it); she keeps the Anethans alive for four episodes, and just generally gets on with the business of being the Doctor. 3/10

Shada – OK, I don’t think this is the great unfinished masterpiece that some fans hope it would be. From what was filmed, it’s obvious that the budget was stretch pretty thin by this point. Perhaps we should be thankful for small mercies that the Kraags will never be seen by anyone who isn’t a card-carrying obsessive. Men with sheets of cardboard stuck to them was never going to work, was it. In stark contrast to Count Scarlioni’s suave coolness, we have Skagra walking the streets of Cambridge looking like the missing member of ABBA. It’s probably unfair of me to comment on it, seeing as it wouldn’t have been in the original production, but Keff McCulloch’s music is very… Keffy. Did the ‘One lump or two? Sugar?’ joke really need a dramatic sting? OK, bad fan, stop being so negative. Romana is still the best companion ever (second only to the fabulous Donna Noble, in my opinion) and the little moment where the Doctor pins a badge on her and they salute each other is adorable. It’s Douglas Addams, so of course the dialogue is going to be witty and delightful, and the plot completely bonkers but utterly charming. If you haven’t already, go out and read the novelisation, because Tom Baker rushing through plot points on the DVD really doesn’t do it justice. A particularly joyful development is the Doctor turning Skagra’s ship into a fan, and Skagra’s ultimate punishment is to watch Doctor Who for all eternity. I’m smiling just writing about it. 7/10

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